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Threesome interview with Petar Živić and Uroš Milkić


As a write for a psych zine I don’t always take all the opportunities to talk to bands from every genre like I should.  So, in another attempt to avoid becoming pigeonholed as a writer, or closeminded as listener, this is an article about some surf music.  I love instrumental surf as much as the next guy, actually scratch that.  I like instrumental rock a lot more than most people.  But even I have to admit that when you’re listening to surf in its truest form, it can get a little boring.  It’s gets a little repetitive and starts to kind of jumble together, there’s just not enough energy or cohesiveness to carry it for an extended amount of time.  That’s where bands like Threesome come in to the picture.  Threesome brings the surging energy of punk and garage rock to the surf arena, combining them into some sort of super-Voltron to create a devastating thee-pronged instrumental attack on the psyche!  Iron legs of devastation are manned by drummer Jovana Petrović, easily propelling the giant robot across a decimated landscape of destruction and havoc.  The brain of the jangling automation is bassist Petar Živić, whose massive bass sounds like the thundering of Thor’s hammer echoing from the heavens, laying the groundwork and creating traction from which the entire engine of brutality is built, while guitarist Uroš Milkić lays utter waste to whatever’s left standing in their way!  If I were to nominate one band to repel hordes of angry Kaiju at our doorstep, it would be Threesome.  There’s a dark, haunting undertone to the music of Threesome as well though, showcasing some of the trademark horror influences that have permeated the genre for so long, but revealing a deeper understanding of where the meaning and energy of that whole movement came from in the first place with their propulsive energy and explosive songwriting, allowing it all to coalesce into these beautiful harmonies and melodies that ebb and breathe like tidal wave pools in a sleepy summer sunset.  There’s no way my words will do the majesty of Threesome’s music any justice, so instead just click the link under these words and let the band speak for themselves…
Listen while you read: http://www.threesome.bandcamp.com/

© Jelena Petkovic

What is Threesome’s current lineup?  Have you all made any changes to the lineup since the band started or has it always been this way?

Petar:  No, the band has had the same lineup since we started playing together, Jovana (drums), Urosh (guitar) and me, Petar (bass).

Uroš:  It's just three of us.  We had two keyboard players before but after a while we decided to continue as trio; less band members, less problems.  

I love playing musical connect the dots and the more people that I talk to the more that I realize a lot of people are in another band, whether that be for creative reasons or trying to pay the bills.  Are any of you in any other active bands at this point?  Have you released any music with anyone else in the past?  If so, can you tell us a little bit about that?

Petar:  Yes, everyone has played in different bands before, and also in different genres than surf, which is the main influence on Threesome’s music.  All three of us have released some music as well, Jovana with Metak Za Zlikovca (jazz, funk, rock), Urosh with Euforia (punk rock) and me, with Tough Guys Of America (indie pop).

Uroš:  I played guitar in a punk-rock band Euforia six years ago.  We recorded two albums with a major label here in Serbia and we played a lot of shows and festivals.  I also played drums in a math-rock band called Cut Self Not; this band probably had the biggest influence on Threesome’s music.  Stray Dogg is a country-folk band I also played drums in for a year and a half.

Where are you originally from?

Petar:  I was born in Zadar, Croatia.  I’ve lived in Belgrade for the last twenty-two years.

Uroš:  Belgrade, Serbia.

What was the local music scene like when you grew up?  Did you see a lot of shows when you were younger?  Do you feel like the local music scene there played a large role in forming your musical tastes or the way that you play today?

Petar:  There were a lot of bands and different styles, mostly rock, and I was going to the shows, but I don’t think it played a large role in my musical taste.  They influenced me in some ways, but they’re not the core of my musical interests.

Uroš:  The hardcore punk scene was strong here when I was younger.  I liked the energy of the shows, stage diving, singing along…  That’s probably the reason why all the bands I’ve played in since have continued to play faster, stronger and louder music.

What was your house like when you were growing up?  Were either your parents or any of your relatives musicians or extremely involved/interested in music?

Petar:  Not my closest family, but yes, my older brother and my uncle.  He introduced me to domestic alternative music.  That was the start.  Eventually, I found my favorite bands through friends and magazines.

Uroš:  We lived in a small apartment and I shared a room with my older brother in the beginning.  He listened to cassettes and CD's from bands he liked and played bass in a rock band, so I was hooked on music from the time I was eight years old.  Other than him, no one played any instruments in my family. 

What was your first real exposure to music?

Petar:  When I decided that I wanted to play guitar I asked my friend who lived next door and played the guitar if I could just give his guitar a little try.  I liked it instantly, so I found my uncle’s old guitar in the basement, cleaned off twenty years of dust, changed the strings and my musical exposure was permanent.

Uroš:  I mentioned my brother’s band.  I went to their rehearsals and to some of their gigs.  Every time they took a break I would play around on the guitar or try and play some beats on the drums.

If you had to pick one defining moment of music, a moment that changed the way you saw everything and opened your eyes to the infinite possibilities, what would it be?

Petar:  The moment I realized that I could write my own music and not just play other people’s stuff.

Uroš:  1992, Nirvana playing the song “Lithium” at the MTV Music Awards.  I was just nine years old and I saw this live performance where they played a one riff song with no guitar solos, screamed loud and broke their equipment at the end.  This was shocking, and until then it was the most fun performance I’d ever seen.  It made me realize that you didn't have to be Joe Satriani or Slash to play guitar.

When did you decide that you wanted to start writing and performing your own music?  What brought that decision about originally?

Petar:  It wasn’t long after I started playing.  We were listening to The Ramones; everyone could do something like that, even if it’s not that simple.

Uroš:  I tried to form a band when I was ten, but no one from my school played any instrument at that time, so I tried teaching this one guy a few riffs I wrote and we played over a Casio rhythm machine.  It was quite fun, so I’ve kept doing it until now.

What was your first instrument?  When did you get it and who gave it to you?

Petar:  It was an old acoustic guitar with palms depicted on the body.  My uncle kind of gave it to me, actually, it was forgotten in the basement and I just took it.  My uncle said it was okay if I wanted to play it...

Uroš:  I had an eye injury when I was nine and after getting an operation and spending some time in a hospital, I had to stay home for one more month where there was less light around.  That’s when my parents bought me an acoustic guitar and I played it twenty four-seven.

What led to the formation of the band and when exactly was that?

Petar:  It was the end of 2009.  We wanted to play something different, something that we’d never played before; instrumental surf.

Uroš:  I had these new surf riffs and the band I was playing in didn't want to play that kind of music, soon after we disbanded.  So, in the summer of 2009 I went to Amsterdam to visit my good friend who was studying at the SAE Institute at the time.  He had a two hour studio session for his exam, so I played a new song I had written.  First the drum tracks, then bass and guitar, it was the first version of our song “First Wave”.  I sent it to Jovana and Petar, and as soon as I came back we started rehearsing.

With the American connotations of the term I almost hesitate to ask, but what does the name Threesome mean or refer to?  How did you all go about choosing the name?  Who came up with?

Uroš:  Music we play is joy for three of us, so this sexy name suits it great.

Petar:  I can’t actually remember, but I think Urosh recorded something, and just labeled the track THREESOME.  Afterwards we found that funny because there were three of us and decided to keep it.

Is there any shared, creed, code, ideal or mantra that the band shares or lives by?

Petar:  Hmmmm, nothing special.  Just write songs, record them and play shows.

Where is Threesome currently located at?

Uroš:  Belgrade, Serbia.

Petar:  We all live in Belgrade, Serbia.

How would you describe the local music scene where you’re at now?

Petar:  In one word, interesting.  There’s something for everyone, lots of quality and variety of music.  Live performances are also amazing, much better than just listening to music at home.  If you book bands from this region, you’re not gonna regret it.

Uroš:  There are a lot of Post New Wave, Americana, Indie Rock and Hip-Hop bands at the moment.

Are you very involved in the local music scene?  Do you book or attend a lot of local shows?

Petar:  Yeah, we do attend other shows and help with booking bands.  Sometimes we don’t play the same music style, but it’s impossible to find band like us because there’s one, maybe two more surf bands in Serbia.  I like it more when there are different genres of bands doing the show, it makes the event better.

Uroš:  We try to do as many shows as we can.  We're the only active surf band here at the moment though, so it's new to a lot of people and it takes time for them to adapt to it.

Do you help record and or release any local music?

Petar:  Sometimes, but I want to do it more.  Maybe in the future I will.

Uroš:  We're currently working on our future studio.  We bought this basement in Belgrade and we're saving money for its adaptation and isolation.  Our plan is to make a recording studio with a lot of vintage and analog equipment, which will consist of both digital and analog approaches to recording music.  If all goes well, I don't see any reason not to start a local label here.

Do you feel like the music scene where you’re at has played a large or important role in the history or sound of Threesome, or do you think you all could be doing what you’re doing and sound like you do regardless of your location or surroundings?

Petar:  I don’t think that the local music scene influenced us at all.  If it did, we wouldn’t play surf.  Surf‘s not common music that a lot of people are listening to in Serbia.

Uroš:  We grew up listening to mostly US and British bands, not that we don't like the local music.  It's just at the time it wasn't very exciting or fresh. 

Every time I try to describe a band I just feel like I’m doing them some grave disservice by not allowing them to speak for themselves or something.  How would you describe Threesome’s sound in your own words to our readers who might not have heard you yet?

Petar:  It’s modern music, with lots of interesting rhythms and retro surf reverb guitar on top.

Uroš:  60's surf sounds with influences of punk-rock energy and rhythmical math rock break beats.

While we’re talking so much about the history and makeup of the band I’m curious to hear who you would cite as your major musical influences?  What about influences on the band as a whole rather than just individually?

Petar:  Man Or Astroman?, Slacktone, Dick Dale, The Beach Boys, Bambi Molesters…

Uroš:  Man Or Astroman? was probably the biggest influence and the reason we started making these kind of songs.  It sounded so different from anything I’d ever played before, I was hooked.

Can you tell us a little bit about Threesome’s songwriting process?  Is there a lot of jamming and exchange of ideas that you all work out and distill into a song together through a process of refinement?  Or is there someone who comes to the rest of the band with a riff or somewhat finished product to work out and compose with the rest of the band?

Petar:  Someone comes in with the main riff and then we all come up with ideas.  Sometimes it’s a five minute process; sometimes it takes months until the song is finished.

Uroš:  Usually Petar or I come in with something we’ve written beforehand and then we all work on it together.  We’ve come up with a few new song ideas with Jovana playing a beat and the two of us writing riffs on the spot, which is totally new to us and opens up new possibilities.

Do you all enjoy recording?  I think that most musicians can really appreciate the final result, holding an album in your hands is an awesome feeling and one that’s really hard to beat.  Getting to that point though, getting everything recorded and laid down the way you want it, especially when it comes to doing that as a band.  Well, it can be very difficult and a little bit stressful to say the least.  How is it recording for you all?

Petar:  Yeah, it’s a hard, stressful process, and the final result isn’t always what you wanted.  Actually recording is really the only stressful thing.  Everything after, like production and mastering is quite fun.

Do you all take a more DIY approach to music where you do things on your own time and turf, with your own equipment and personnel or do you utilize studio environments when recording?

Petar:  The first album was a studio thing, but we always try do everything and control everything that we can, because we know what we want, and that’s the main thing.  I hope our second album is recorded in our own studio, where we can have the freedom to do what we want with the sound.

Does Threesome do a lot of preparatory work before you record?  Is it a situation where you feel like you have to get things sounding just the way that you want them and all worked out like clockwork, or is recording more of an organic process where things have a little bit of breathing room to change and evolve?

Petar:  It’s a bit of both.  We try to prepare everything, but you actually don’t know what’s going to happen so you have to be open to changing your approach during recording.  You have to be flexible, like in everyday life.

Your first release that I know of was the three track self-titled, self-released Threesome CD-R from 2010 which was limited to only like 50 copies if I’ve read correctly.  What was the recording of the material for that CD-R like?  Where and when were those tracks recorded?  Who recoded them?  What kind of equipment was used? 

Petar:  Our friend Goran Milošević recorded it.  The guitar and bass were recorded at his house and the drums were done at UNDERGROUND studios.  It was totally digital, nothing analog, but I think its okay for our first EP.

All three tracks that appeared on the self-titled CD-R EP, “First Wave”, “Snow Turf” and “Wahine”, also appear on your full-length follow up from 2011 Adriatica for DemoFest Music and Double Crown Records.  Are those the same mixes and recordings that are featured on the album as well as the EP or were any of these re-recorded or anything?

Petar:  We had a chance to rerecord the songs on analog equipment, so we did.  Everything on ADRIATICA is recorded on analog tape.  It wouldn’t be logical to have the same mixes, digital verse analog.

Can you talk a little bit about the recording of the Adriatica album?  Can you share some memories of recording that first album?  Were the session(s) very different than those for your earlier EP?  When and where was it recorded?  Who recorded it?  What kind of equipment was used?


Petar:  Hrvoje Nikšić recorded ADRIATICA in February of 2011 in Zagreb.  We had a funny saying, “Serbs are playing, Bosnians are paying”, because we won the recording in Banja Luka at DemoFest competition and Croatians were recording the album.  Yeah, everything was different than before, but I think it always is, because every producer has his own way to record a band.  First thing is we recorded on tape, 24-channels verse the earlier computer recordings; that’s probably the main difference.  On a computer you can repeat takes as many times as you like, but with tape recordings you don’t have that kind of flexibility, but the sound is much better.  I’d like to mention that there were twelve channels just for drums, three channels for guitar and two for bass; big sound.  Everything was going through a Sound Craft 24-channel analog mixer and lots of analog preamps, so the sound was pretty warm and retro.


In 2012 you released a split cassette with Man Zero on Guranje S Litice and RnkaRnka Records.  I know that tape was a limited edition affair and I did a little pit of poking around and I found out that due to a delay with the cassettes 50 limited edition CD-Rs were produced so that you could take them out on tour with you.  I could not however find out how many copies the tape was limited to, do you know? 

Petar:  I don’t remember either; think it’s something like 200 tapes.

That featured three all new tracks from Threesome, “Tellurian”, “Latitude Zero” and “Daylighting”.  Were the session(s) for this split similar to those for the Adriatica album?  When were these track recorded?  Where was it recorded and who recorded it?  What kind of equipment was used?

Petar:  No, we recorded them on our own at home except for the drums; they were recorded at a big hall, the REX culture center, where Jovana was working back then.  We used a ZOOM H4N to record the big atmosphere and reverb in the hall, it was fun.


Uroš:  Those are the songs we made after Adriatica but before we went on our first European tour.  We recorded them in a DIY environment using equipment I had at that time.  We used a Sound Craft board and 16-track audio interface.  It was recorded and mixed very fast because we were running out of time.

Does Threesome have any music that we haven’t talked about yet, maybe a single ora song on a compilation that I might have missed?

Petar:  Yeah, we recorded one session when we were touring Italy.  The guys from HOT POT records in Bologna invited us to their studio after a gig we did there.  There’s one new song that we’re gonna put on our second album from those recordings.

With the Man Zero split being over a year old at this point are there any plans for any other releases in the works or coming up at this point?

Uroš:  Yes.  We have plans to record an LP, or at least EP this year.

Petar:  Yeah, we’re working on our new album.  I think we have seven or eight new songs.  We hope to record it in our new studio that we’re planning to build.  It’s gonna be a genuine THREESOME release.  We’re expecting it to be done before the Surfer Joe festival, June to be precise.

With the completely insane international postage rate increases these last few year I try to provide our readers with as many options as I possibly can or picking up import releases.  Where’s the best place for our US readers to pick up copies of your music?

Uroš:  You can buy CD’s of our album at the Double Crown Records website!!!

What about our national and international readers?

Uroš:  We still don’t have any European distribution, so the only way to buy vinyl, CDs or cassettes is at our shows or through mail order.  We’re only selling mp3 or lossless digital formats on our Bandcamp page though.

And where’s the best place for our readers to keep up with the latest news like upcoming shows and album releases from Threesome at?

Petar:  Our website, Facebook or our Bandcamp page

Uroš:  Our webpage or our Facebook page.

Are there any major goals that Threesome is looking to accomplish in 2014?

Petar:  Yes, to record our second album, build the studio, play and tour…

Uroš:  New album or EP is a must.

Do you remember what the first song that Threesome ever played live was?  Where and when would that have been?

Uroš:  Uh …

Petar:  It was April 11th 2010 with Papier Tigre from France and Kill Me Laser from Serbia at KC GRAD in Belgrade.  The first song was really the first, “First Wave”.

Does Threesome spend a lot of time on the road?  Do you all enjoy touring?  What’s life like out on the road for Threesome?

Petar:  Yeah, we’ve done three tours already and we always want more, maybe the USA soon.  We enjoy it, lots of new people, places and stories, but it’s very hard for us because we don’t have a driver or a roadie, we do it ourselves.


Uroš:  We would do it a lot more but we also have to work, we mostly play weekends right now.  Last year we only had about forty shows, the year before that there were a lot more because we had a one month European tour and a few smaller tours.  If you ask me, I thing I could do a six months tour every year.  It's a really exciting life, meeting new people and cultures every day.

What, if anything, do you all have planned as far as touring goes for 2014 so far?

Petar:  The plan was to go to France in January, but it didn’t happen unfortunately.  In June we’re playing at the Surfer Joe Summer Festival and we hope to book a few gigs and turn it into a tour maybe, we’ll see.


Uroš:  We had plans to do U.S. tour this summer, but that had to be moved to next year.  We'll try to do another European tour after we play the Surfer Joe Summer festival in June.


Who are some of your personal favorite bands that you all have had the chance to play with over the last few years?

Petar:  For me, Bitch Boys from Slovenia.  I listened to their music before we met them, they really rock and they’re great people.

Uroš:  This year’s Surfer Joe Summer Festival; really awesome lineup.

In your dreams, who are you on tour with?

Petar:  With Man Or Astroman?, Slacktone, Messer Chups and Bambi Molesters.

Uroš:  Daikaiju and Man Or Astroman?.

Do you have any funny or interesting stories from any of you live shows or performances that you’d like to share here with our readers?

Petar:  I have a tendency to fall, because of all the jumping on stage.  We played in Novi Sad and I fell from the stage because I stepped on the stairs, but my friend helped me and everything was okay.  Also, once in Škofja Loka (Slovenia), I fell backwards turn with the bass, it was so funny!


Uroš:  There’s so many…  On our first European tour we had a gig in Lucerne, Switzerland.  We had a long drive there and when we arrived, the people at the club told us that there was no gig and that this girl who had booked our show quit her job two weeks before that.  Of course, she didn’t tell us this.  There was some kind of their multicultural Thanksgiving Day going in the street so parents and kids of various nationalities came to this party to make food, have some drinks and watch the soccer championship.  After a while of hanging out they asked us to play a show for their kids before the game without knowing what kind of music we play.  They promised us the same deal and accommodations.  This was a very odd, and extremely funny situation.  We were very lucky.  

Do you all give a lot of thought to the visual aspect of the band?  The artwork on flyers, posters, merchandise and covers that kind of thing?  Do you all have a go-to artist for those kind of things?  If so, who is that and how did you originally get hooked up with him or her?

Petar:  We have friends that do it for us; Stefan Unković and Sanja Drakulić.  Stefan did the covers, and Sanja has mostly done posters.  I knew Stefan before Threesome became a band and we played together in Tough Guys Of America; Sanja also.  We’re all friends; Belgrade isn’t that big of a city.

Uroš:  Our friend Stefan Unković from Super Size She worked with us on our first EP and LP.  Both cover photographs were done by Ana Kraš.  Ana’s an artist from Belgrade who’s lived in the U.S. for the last few years, and she took the photos somewhere on her journeys there.  Lately our good friend Sanja Drakulić is helping us with tour posters and a new web page that we’re working on.  She moved to Norway to work in a graphic design agency not long ago though, so it’s taking us some time to finish it.

With all of the various mediums of release available to musicians today I’m always curious why they choose and prefer the methods of release that they do.  Do you have a preferred medium of release for your own music?  What about when you’re listening to and or purchasing music?  If you do have a preference can you talk a little bit about why?

Petar:  I prefer the vinyl medium.  First it’s big, alright, a much better thing to present you than a CD.  You can’t copy vinyl, a CD you can; that’s an advantage.  And lastly, though it’s subjective, the sound is much better and warmer.  I know you can maybe reach that level of perfection with a digital algorithm which can reproduce sound as good as analog, but for now, vinyl’s better; plus the first two things I mentioned.

Uroš:  I enjoy listening to vinyl.  The whole concept of spending time putting it on, looking at the cover, not skipping parts of the album and all that.

Do you have a music collection at all?  If so can you tell us a bit about it?

Petar:  Yes, I have all The Ramones albums on CD, a few pieces of vinyl I love, like Beach Boys, Al Green, The Descendents, All, the B52’s…  I don’t know, I always wanna have more.

Uroš:  Jovana and I have a nice collection of vinyl from bands we’ve played with on tour or from shows in town.  Whenever we have time to go to a record shop on tour, I try and find vinyl from some of my favorite artists.

I grew up around a fairly large collection of music and I was encouraged from a pretty young age to listen to, and enjoy the collection.  So I would go up to these enormous shelves of music that just never seemed to end when I was a kid and pick something completely at random to listen to, kick back in the beanie bag, read the liner notes, stare at the artwork and just let the whole experience transport me off to another place!  As a result I developed a deep love of physical music that I don’t think I’ll probably ever grow out of.  Do you have any such connection with physically released music?

Petar:  Yes, I do.  But in my case, that’s mostly audio cassettes, and they’re not the originals, so the artwork is either copied or you just write the songs yourself on the cover.  We grew up in isolation, so at some points, we couldn’t find any original releases.  But it still strikes me when I see my old cassette collection.

Uroš:  Yeah, of course.  I had a similar connection when I was a kid.  Too bad my family got rid of most of their record collection in the 90’s when CD’s took their place.  Our current collection still isn’t that big, but I’m working on it.

As much as I love my music collection there’s always been the major issue of portability for me.  When I was out on the road I never had enough access to my music.  Digital music has all but eliminated this problem overnight but the real game changer has been its combination with the internet.  Together they have both exposed people to a world of music that they otherwise would never have been privy to, and for independent artists willing to harbor and promote a healthy online presence it really seems to have levelled the playing field somewhat.  On the other hand, illegal downloading is running rampant in the industry right now and a lot of people feel like music is becoming a disposable experience.  As an artist during the reign of the digital era, what’s your opinion on digital music and distribution?

Petar:  Distribution is fast and more efficient, we have to say that.  And embrace it somehow, because the world is changing and so is the music industry.  We have to find a new pattern, and try to sell concerts more, not medium.  We just use the medium however we can to try and bring people to the shows, try somehow to take advantage of it, because it’s just like that and you can’t change it.

Uroš:  I think everyone has the right to listen to music for free.  If you like it, buy it.  If you like the band, pay for a ticket to their gig or buy the vinyl or a t-shirt from them.  That way, every good band gets what they deserve and earn their money and every shitty band doesn’t.  

I try to keep up with as much good music as I possibly can but with all of the outlets for music and my time being so limited there’s just not enough hours in the day to keep up with one-percent of the amazing stuff going on out there!  Is there anyone from your local scene or area that I should be listening to that I might not have heard of before?

Petar:  Over here there are lots and lots of bands and music; there’s not enough time to mention people from just for this region, I’m not kidding.  I could mention some, but I’ll probably miss others; Repetitor, Inje, Temple Of The Smoke, While, Stray Dogg, Halftones, Stuttgart online, VIS Limunada, Grandpa Candys, Darkwood Dub, 36 Daggers (R.I.P.)…

Uroš:  There’re a lot of great bands, but first check out this amazing band called Repetitor; two girls on drums and bass and a crazy guitarist/singer.  If you like it I’ll tell you about other bands.

What about nationally and internationally?

Petar:  Uh, that’s a really difficult question, so I’ll just mention my latest crush, Blood Orange.

Uroš:  Have you heard about Medications or Karate?  They’re just two of our many under-credited bands.  Also Rahiml; the band I mentioned I played in, Cut Self Not played with them in Belgrade on their tour in 2008.  They stopped playing soon after that.

Thanks so much for taking the time to talk with me about the band, it’s been a real pleasure getting all this back story and learning so much about the band!  Before we call it a day and head off into the sunset though, is there anything that I might have missed or that you’d just like to take this opportunity to talk to me or our readers about?

Uroš:  Thank you for preparing this amazing interview!  After all these questions I really can’t say you missed anything.

Petar:  Just keep calm and listen to any kind of music!  Surf’s up!

Band will be touring in California in August and their brand new EP is out now:

DISCOGRAPHY
(2010)  Threesome – Threesome – digital, CD-R – Self-Released (Limited to 50 copies)
(2011)  Threesome – Adriatica – digital, CD, 12” – Demofest Music/Double Crown Records
(2012)  Threesome/Man Zero – Threesom/Man Zero Split – Cassette Tape, CD-R (Promo) - Guranje S Litice/SuperSizeShe/RnkaRnka Records (Cassette Tape limited to ? copies, CD-R promo limited to 50 copies)
(2014)  Various Artists – Monsters Of Surf Guitar – digital, CD – Dingdong Records (Threesome contributes the track “Telurian” from their Man Zero split)


Interview made by Klemen Breznikar/2014
© Copyright http://psychedelicbaby.blogspot.com/2014

1 comment:

Surfin' Bird said...

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