It's Psychedelic Baby Magazine

It's Psychedelic Baby is an independent, music magazine. We are covering alternative, underground, non-commercial and non-mainstream artists in variety of shapes and genres. Exclusive interviews, reviews and articles. A place where musicians can express themselves. We serve an international readership.

Beau - “When Butterflies Scream” (2017) review


Beau - When Butterflies Scream (Cherry Red Records, 2017)

The singer-songwriter Trevor Midgley, known as Beau, has aged well like all good vintage stock; still a rich, heady consistency after all these years. From a Yorkshire teen band that got a BBC session to kudos and a number one in Lebanon with John Peel’s first release on Dandelion Records in the late sixties, he has been prolific in this century with several albums in various formats by Cherry Red among others. He’s also recorded electronic music recently under the moniker Simfonica. Unusually, Beau’s high regard in folk circles has been achieved with few gigs throughout those fifty years.

All star cast of weirdos record James Joyce’s “Finnegans Wake” (part two)


We’re pleased to premiere a second collection of tracks from the upcoming release of Waywords and Meansigns, an international project setting James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake to music. 


You can read more about the project, and hear our first premiere here.

Record Store Day: The War on Drugs - “Thinking of a Place” (2017) review


Record Store Day:
The War on Drugs - Thinking of a Place (Atlantic Records, 2017)

In the last eighteen months the only thing we’ve heard from War On Drugs was their addition to the Day of the Dead compilation, with the song “Touch of Gray.” Now with rumors having swirled for entirely too long, finally the heavens have parted and we’ve been treated to their new intoxicating eleven minute epic “Thinking of a Place,” delivered on a vinyl format of 5500 copies worldwide.

“Pharmacopious” (Part 1) by Jenell Kesler


The first postcard I ever received read, “Being born into the dream bears no weight.”
Those sentiments are dedicated to my husband Rob, for doing so much more than riding shotgun.

A Night Nurse Production © 2014

Others have written reports from the Innerzone, I’ve heard about them, though I’ve never read them first hand. It seems that coming back from the Innerzone requires that everything one becomes be left behind in the care of the Customs Office, and while there’s a small amount of mail out of the Innerzone, it’s terribly slow, and finding a stamp is all but impossible. It was there, while standing in line that a man in a rather expensive trench-coat took me aside for the very first time, and in the shadow of an ancient sandstone sculpture informed me that one should never write about truth. He was reading this from a folded piece of yellowed paper he kept in this pocket. This man, who for now shall remain nameless, went on to say, while rubbing the tips of his fingers across his lower lip, as if to remember the taste of something he’d once touched, that one should never write about one’s personal hallucinations either, saying that they’d be misappropriated, and could perhaps, at some point be used against one in some wayward court of law. And therein lines the dilemma, especially if one has a penchant for flight, that either hallucinations are real, and if so, hallucinations are truth, leaving reality as I’ve always felt, to be nothing more than a ride in an uphill train on lubricated rails.

Rückwater - “Bonehead” (2017) review


Rückwater Bonehead (2017) 

Hailing from Scandanvia, Rückwater’s debut EP, Bonehead, is a fantastic stoner rock EP, similar to Graveyard, but with some neopsychedelic vibes. The album kicks off with the awesome, heavy, powerful “Once More With Feeling”, it’s pure old school hard rock. Zeppelin like vocals, and grooves. The riff is so fucking massive and intense. “No Gain” has an almost a trippy punk/grunge rock vibe, fast paced, and frantic. Fantastic vocals, and frantic. “Labrynth” has a pure blues vibe. Clean, warm sounding guitars start it off. Almost an Alice In Chains vibe.

Interview with “Space Rocker” Rustic Rod Goodway about Magic Muscle, ...


Rod Goodway is without a doubt an important name in UK’s progressive rock scene. Sadly he never got lucky enough to gain sizable popularity with the labels, which didn’t understand yet, what “far out” ideas in music were all about. Rod Goodway is definitely one of the most underrated musicians and we are really happy that we sat down and discussed his story. From the start in blues oriented bands like Rod & The Sceptres, The Pack and the legendary Artwoods, to psychedelic “summer of love” projects like J.P. Sunshine and White Rabbit. Rod was also an important part of freaked-out mind mischief which culminated in group called Rustic Hinge and the Provincial Swimmers (a commune of freaks) that took considerable amount of psychedelics that got linked with their ideas of what music can sound like. After having a bit of bad luck with how the project ended, Rod moved on to form Magic Muscle, which by the end of 1972 had built a strong cult following. They were space rockers. Something similar to Hawkind. Read much more in the following interview.

Brainstory - “Dreams” premiere


Brainstory’s self titled “mini-album” is a landmark for this Inland Empire born trio of jazz musicians. The Album takes listeners on a maiden voyage inward through the skies of the soul. The journey embarks its listeners through psychedelic landscapes and untouched terrains of psych-rock jazz leaving its passengers in a cathartic state of euphoria. Humanistic themes such as illusions, desires, and inner contemplation relate the listener back to his or herself in an effort to clear a path of self discovery and enlightenment. The band feels all too much that the word “psychedelic” has lost its true meaning in today’s music scene. Instead, the word suggests retro outfits and 1960s nostalgia. Brainstory wishes to remind audiences that psychedelic music is aimed at freeing the mind and soul to explore the depths of existence in this vast universe of being. www.brainstorymusic.com

Modern Mal - “Just a Satellite” premiere


Like an oasis appearing to the lone, wearied cowboy, rebel-psych Americana group Modern Mal’s The Misanthrope Family Album dropping May 12th 2017, is the meeting of traditional country with a mirage of tropical beach-psych. 


“This song was written after star gazing one night. I saw a huge bright light in the sky, and wondered if it could be a UFO, or a planet, or a supernova, or something remarkably rare. But it turned out to be just a common satellite flare, which was kind of a let down. At the time, I found this to be relatively similar to my own self-image.
It’s about perspective. Some things can still be beautiful, even if they are a rusty man-made piece of space-debris.

Trip Hill - “Automatic Folk & Flowers” (2015) review


Trip Hill - Automatic Folk & Flowers (2015)

I’m hoping to encompass reviews for the last four outings by Trip Hill, Ten Petals of Manipura, Raining Metallic Mushroom, Lamp of the Universe and Automatic Folk & Flowers into one comprehensive discussion. While I’m most familiar with his stunning 2000 release Takes from Oblivion, which did have a few weak songs, the album was long enough that I was able to create a worthy collection [over 51 minutes] that was strong enough, psychedelically inspiring enough, and musically intoxicating enough, to send me through the rest of his material for a third time just to see if there was something that I was missing, something that may have eluded me, even a single song that I could add to my collection … though that proved not to be the case.

Cindy Lee Berryhill - “The Adventurist” (2017) review


Cindy Lee Berryhill The Adventurist (Omnivore Recordings, 2017)

Cindy Lee Berryhill hasn’t released an album since 2008’s Beloved Stranger. Since then, her spouse, Paul Williams, founder of Crawdaddy magazine, has passed away after years of gentle decline in a nursing home, their son is in 10th grade, and handy at rebuilding computers, for one thing ... times are changing so fast – whoever thought we’d elect a reality game show host (as foresworn and pre-seen by Berryhill in 1987’s “Trump”)*, but here it is, that time. Ways have changed since then for listeners, too. We’re more likely to sample and store one song at a time on our I-pads due to catchiness than savor and fully perceive entire song cycles as bodies of work, the way it always used to be done, when Paul Williams was a teen with a typewriter fired with the impulse of intelligent writing about pop music with transcendence as its perennial subject matter.

Jim Haney of Perhaps and Kamikaze Tapes


Jim Haney of Boston eclectic experimental trio Perhaps and owner of boutique cassette label Kamikaze Tapes talks about his efforts in DIY music world.

How did you first get interested in music and what were some major influences that made you start your own music?

The first CD that I bought with my own money was Meatloaf’s Bat Out Of Hell. I think I was 8 or 9. I thought the album cover looked really cool. I grew up listening to mostly classic rock like Led Zeppelin and The Rolling Stones. I started branching out into listening to more experimental and progressive stuff when I was a teenager. Probably the most influential albums for me were Yes, Close To The Edge and Relayer. They had absolutely everything that I had been looking for... the music was amazing, they tied the album together with concepts and had amazing artwork. Listening to early Yes records felt like watching a movie to me. Another huge influence for me was (obviously) The Grateful Dead. I used to listen to Live/Dead almost every morning before school while I had my coffee. Then of course later on I started to explore jazz/fusion stuff like Mahavishnu etc...