It's Psychedelic Baby Magazine

It's Psychedelic Baby is an independent, music magazine. We are covering alternative, underground, non-commercial and non-mainstream artists in variety of shapes and genres. Exclusive interviews, reviews and articles. A place where musicians can express themselves. We serve an international readership.

Reason - “The Age Of Reason” (1969) review


Reason - The Age Of Reason (Gear Fab Records, 1969/2016 reissue)

An obscurity brought back to life, The Age Of Reason initially came out on the Georgetown label in 1969. The album was recorded by Reason, a Washington DC based band consisting of Tommy Dildy on vocals and keyboards, Billy Windsor on vocals and guitar, Bill Manning on drums and vocals, and bassists J. Jenson and T. Gorka. Danny Gatton, who eventually achieved status as “the greatest guitarist you have never heard” also participated in the project.

The Psychedelic Schafferson Jetplane - “The Psychedelic Schafferson Jetplane” (2010) review


The Psychedelic Schafferson Jetplane - The Psychedelic Schafferson Jetplane (Pastabase, 2010)

Drawing the group’s name [though this could very well be the work of a single visionary person] from the historic psychedelic band The Jefferson Airplane, this Chilean experience, The Psychedelic Schafferson Jetplane offer up a bit of 60’s hazy intoxication, but only so much as Spacemen 3 did in the 90’s, creating a new atmosphere that shares a kindred spirit for haunting musical delights, ethereal rhythmic meanderings and sonic layering that moves the music forward, though staying true to a warm scripted environment laced with a penchant for substances of the hypnotic nature.

Uffe Lorenzen - “Galmandsværk” (2017) review


Uffe Lorenzen - Galmandsværk (Bad Afro Records, 2017)

Uffe (Lorenzo Woodrose for most people) has created his first solo album. Last winter he spent 10 weeks on the island of Gomera off the coast of Africa. He rented a small apartment and spent time with his guitar, recorder and his mind.

Domboshawa interview


Anders Broström is a Swedish multi-instrumentalist. His latest album Mind Electrix consist of improvised jams for fans of lysergic space rock. Drone Rock Records released Mind Electrix on vinyl.

What do you consider to be your first real exposure to music?

I’m from a very musical home where my parents worked with music so there was always a lot of music at home, they played Beatles, the Moody Blues and Billy Joel and a lot of other of great music, but the first music that was mine own was heavy metal, 1984 was the year when I started to buy my own records, I loved Kiss, Mötley Crue, Twisted Sister, Dio, Alice Cooper, Guns N’ Roses and everything else that was happening back then.
My introduction to psychedelic music was probably in 1993 or something, I was taking drum lessons when I was younger and my parents had taped the Woodstock movie from the tv and they showed me Santana and the drum solo Michael Shrieve does in “Soul Sacrifice.” I was blown away! I watched the whole movie about 200 times and started buying records by Jefferson Airplane, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Grateful Dead, Country Joe And the Fish and much more from the San Francisco scene, then from there it just grow with the English bands and Swedish bands and so forth, I loved the whole “turn on, tune in, drop out” vibe.
The band I got really hooked on was Grateful Dead, I’m a huge deadhead.
Instrumental music with a lot of jamming and improvisation is really awesome, Earthless, Phish or Ozric Tentacles, it’s all great.

Skid Row - Skid / 34 Hours (2017) review


Skid Row - Skid / 34 Hours (BGO CD1302; 38.29 / 57.33 mins)

The original Skid Row are usually called Gary Moore’s band and therefore blues, but these confuse fiction with fact. The band was actually started by bassist/vocalist Brendan ‘Brush’ Shiels, nicknamed by his previous Uptown Band’s manager because of his moustache and long hair (this was, after all, the age of clean-cut, sequined show bands in Ireland). And blues is well stirred in this heady brew of flavours. The developing late ’60s Irish rock scene boasted Taste with Rory Gallagher, Van Morrison’s Them, The Action and Granny’s Intentions (on Deram) soon followed by Thin Lizzy.

Peter J. Faber-Jonker - “The Faber Book of Ballads” (2017)


Peter J. Faber-Jonker is a Rotterdam based guitarist-songwriter well known for his contemporary classic pop-sound. The Faber Book Of Ballads is an ambitious double album! Read more about its making.

From The Vault: Caravan - “If I Could Do It All Over Again, I’d Do It All Over You” (1970)


Without a doubt, most people walked backwards to find If I Could Do It All Over Again, I’d Do It All Over You from the success Caravan had with In The Land Of Gray and Pink, with this album seeming to have gained more praise and acceptance as the years have rolled on.

Electric Wizard interview with Jus Oborn: “Wizard Bloody Wizard”


Wizard Bloody Wizard
I hope we will start a new quest for a heavier, darker, dirtier sound again... this is just the beginning. The slate is clean.

A new album by Electric Wizard. Interview with Jus Oborn about Wizard Bloody Wizard available on 17 November 2017. 

I guess Wizard Bloody Wizard is a step to the roots?

Yeah the idea was to get back to our earliest musical influences. To get back to the core of the actual musicians that first inspired us to pick up a guitar. Hendrix, Ron Asheton, Iommi, Leigh Stephens, Jimmy Page etc. And to get back to the roots of heavy music... the blues, rock’n’roll etc.

The songs are fusion of the Stooges, Black Sabbath, early Alice Cooper, Blue Cheer and other heavy psych bands of the time. For me it’s like giving a candy to a kid, y’know? 

Haha... me too. I guess we are pretty much totally obsessed with the heavy bands from this period... all these bands created heavy rock/metal. It’s the birth place of all the music I still dig. I really hoped we could create something that was contemporaneous to all those albums... something that would stand outside of time and trends.

Stray - “Fire & Glass: The Pye Recordings 1975-1976” (2017) review


Stray - Fire & Glass: The Pye Recordings 1975-1976 (Cherry Red Records, 2017)

“Fire & Glass” is part two of the Stray saga, presented by Cherry Red Records, UK, a follow up to the 2017 four disc box set “All In Your Mind: The Transatlantic Yeas 1970-1974”, a four disc box set, which was reviewed a couple of weeks ago. This two disc, thirty five track set compiles all of the band’s recordings released by Pye Records on their Dawn imprint, home to Mungo Jerry and many other artists. Thus, “Fire & Glass” contains three LPs, a single edit, a non-LP b-side and two previously unreleased album outtakes, nearly two and a half hours of prime time rock and roll.

From The Vault: Neil Young - “After The Gold Rush” (1970)


So many of my early musical experiences were overshadowed by the War in Vietnam ... I used to envy those who discovered this album while in college, or on the road, sunk deeply into some overstuffed chair, a head full of weed, candles flickering in the darkness, wrapped in the arms of a lover or a friend. After The Gold Rush was first played for me by another Nurse who’d just returned from R&R. It was in the wee small hours of the morning, in one of many Evac Hospitals that dotted Southeast Asia, and she stood quietly, arms filled with new records, as I sat lost in needlework, patching the ripped uniforms and darning the socks of my boys. “This is for you,” I remember her saying, and I laughed seeing the album jacket, with the patches sewed onto Neil’s jeans. But the album did quickly become my personal record, especially side two, laced with lo-fi songs of distant places, double meanings, heartache, and change ... yet through it all, Neil cracked the door, leaving room for a breath of hope ... something that was in short supply in my corner of the world. 

Stack Waddy - “So Who The Hell Is Stack Waddy?” (2017) review


Stack Waddy “So Who The Hell Is Stack Waddy?” (Cherry Red Records, 2017)

Taking their name from a character in a Mad Magazine comic strip, singer John Knail, guitarist Mick Stott, bass player Stuart Banham and drummer Steve Revell formed Stack Waddy in late summer 1969 in Timperley, a suburban village, southwest of Manchester. Knail and Stott had been in a rhythm and blues band The Knails in 1965, while Stott and Banham later played in a power trio, New Religion, in 1968. Stack Waddy played the first Buxton Blues Festival, headlined by Fleetwood Mac, where they were spotted by DJ John Peel, as well as Zig Zag magazine’s Dave Neale. Taking the stage at 2 AM, the band jumped into their cover of Dale Hawkins’ “Suzie Q” impressing Peel sufficiently to sign the band to his recently created Dandelion Records label. Throughout 1969 Stack Waddy dazzled audiences with their mixture of primal rhythm and blues, drawing on the influences of Bo Diddley and Willie Dixon, and heavy psychedelic rock a la Cream and Hendrix. As with their recordings, begun in 1970, Stott’s delivery was filled with heavy doses of the overdrive on his amp/guitar combo and its raging tone was the signature of Stack Waddy’s intimidating sound, described by Zig Zag Magazine’s Dave Neale as a “lot of wonderful noise with a killer beat. They were loud and uncompromising!”